Microsoft Exploitability Index

Earlier today, this article from ComputerWorld came across my desk.  The headline grabbed my attention, having indicated controversy and disagreement, which of course I’m going to look into.  The article, which cites Microsoft’s semi-annual security intelligence report, claims that  Microsoft has only been right in it’s vulnerability exploitability predictions about 27% of the time.  Others quoted in the article purport that since their accuracy is so low, what’s the point? [...]

DEFCON 17

After staying with some of my local Vegas friends during BlackHat, I went over and checked into the Riviera for DEFCON 17 on Thursday afternoon.  After dropping my bags in my room and getting my temporary paper badge because they were already out of the electronic badges, I ran back up to my room for a bit and then headed over to the Microsoft party which I already wrote about [...]

By |2009-08-11T15:51:49+00:00August 11th, 2009|conference, hpavc, security, security research|0 Comments

BlackHat USA 2009

Last week and through the weekend I was in Las Vegas for this year’s annual block of hacker conferences, BlackHat USA and DEFCON.  This year was a bit different for me as my employer no longer covers conference expenses (even if you’re speaking!), so since I was there not representing a company and entirely on my own dime, I stayed with some local friends for the first half of my [...]

By |2009-08-07T13:27:00+00:00August 7th, 2009|conference, hpavc, security, security research|0 Comments

MD5? Really?

First let me say that this article is not meant to diminish the work that Alexander Sotirov et. all have been doing for the past 6 months.  It’s good work, has brought about some awesome results, and has demonstrated what was once a theoretical attack on PKI certificates based on MD5 hash collisions.  What I’m amazed at is that it had the impact that it actually did. […]

The Folly of a Scheduled Patch Release Cycle

A number of years ago, Microsoft led the charge by moving away from a dynamic patch release schedule to a monthly patch release schedule, essentially creating an imposed monthly patch cycle for their customers.  Since then, many other vendors have followed suit.  There are opinions and arguments supporting both a release schedule philosophy as well as a release upon completion philosophy, and today I’m going to outline where I stand [...]

DEFCON 16

DEFCON is always entertaining as it’s the largest hacker conference in North America. Back to back with it’s corporate counterpart, Black Hat, it generally draws thousands of hacker-type people to Las Vegas every summer. The related parties, shenanigans, and drama surrounding it are legendary, and this year was no different. Below are my thoughts on the talks I was able to attend. […]

Configuring DNSSEC in BIND

DNSSEC, which I mentioned in my previous post about mitigation for Kaminsky’s recent DNS cache poisoning flaw, are the SECurity extensions for the Domain Name System (DNS). It essentially adds cryptography to DNS, allowing authoritative nameservers to cryptographically sign their zones and resource records, which in turn allows caching/recursive nameservers to verify them. This prevents attacks against the recent cache poisoning flaw by allowing the nameserver under attack to verify [...]